Endings, a Review

Endings, I feel, are vastly important.

I recently read Gifts by Ursula K. Le Guin and, while her writing was a bit unorthodox I did feel that pull toward the characters and was able to envision the world she had created. The ending, however, disappointed the hell out of me.

For those of you who don’t know – and don’t feel badly, I didn’t know about her either until a friend of mine suggested the book – Gifts is a fantasy novel about a race of people who have, well, gifts. Some can destroy life, some can heal the sick, some can make you do things unwillingly, and some can call animals. There are other gifts as well, and there are those who have no gifts at all. It’s a rather intriguing plot, the characters are well-written, and the narration is strangely wonderful – think of a story within a story within a story type of deal, all being told by a blind man.

 All good things.

Until the last few chapters.

Nothing happened. And I understand that sometimes, in certain stories, nothing should happen but in a story like this, with such a destructive fascinating quality to it, something should have happened.  Anything should have happened. I don’t want to give it away, in case any of my readers would like to try the story out – but I must warn you, be prepared! Nothing happens! The lack of an ‘ending’ shocked me. And not in a good way I might add. The thing that annoyed me most? She’s a good writer! She has a lovely idea, solid characters, and a fantasy world that’s believable! And then she botches the ending? I was sorely disappointed.

(Honestly, it reminded me of the ending of The Hunger Games – also disappointing as all get out – but I won’t get into that right now.)

And so, I hope the ink pooling into words on this page will sufficiently capture how loudly I shout – ENDINGS ARE IMPORTANT! If you’ve spent hours, days, moths, years, or merely seconds on a piece of work, have an ending readers will enjoy. End it so the characters get retribution, end it so the links connect, end it so the plot has meaning, life, wisdom to it somehow, someway, to someone.

End it well.

If you don’t the botched ending will be the one thing people remember, the one thing your readers will talk about in the coming days, months, even years. If you don’t, you’ll face the audience, your audience, merely shrugging when they speak of your work. Is that what you want? No.

Until next time.
Warm regards,
Kellie

The End is Really Another Beginning

I did it!

I finally completed the goal that I’ve been striving for since I was thirteen. I wrote a novel. (Okay, so truthfully there were two parts to that goal – write a novel and then publish it – so I’ve completed only one aspect but the publishing part will come later. Carrying on…) A year and a half after the main character entered my mind, I finally got to pen ‘The End’ in italics in brackets centered on the page. Overkill? Perhaps. But I was happy to do such extravagant writing to prove my point.

However, after penning The End (and celebrating with a cutting edge facebook and twitter update) I realized that this is not the end at all. I still have a ton of work to do on this project.

Editing, of course.
Revising, of course.
Editing (again).
Revising (again).

Adding aspects I’ve neglected, taking out sections I disliked, clarifying ideas, rounding out characters. Musing about the next book in the series. Essentially I’m going to be re-writing this novel to be the best that it can possibly be. I’ve got a good foundation to work with, now it’s just tweaking the writing a bit.

Then after the novel is perfect – or I’m tired of looking at it, haha – there’s the query letters that have to be written and combed through, the manuscript samples to be sent out, the agents to query and publishers to scope. I’ve had multiple writers tell me that writing the story is the fun part and I’m really starting to believe it. This process, it’s going to take time and effort and even more time but I’m glad that the first step to making my dream come true is complete.

I’m looking forward to traversing the choppy waters that make up the publishing world. Now if in a few months I end up ranting about it, you have my permission to smack me and remind me of this posting.

Until then…
Warm regards,
Kellie