If you want to write a book, here are five actual tips. (Don’t quit!)

Okay, my fellow writers, we all know that Beast article sucked. Maybe it was trying to be a tough-love kind of motivation. (Yes, it takes dedication.) Maybe it was trying to relate a truth about writing. (Yes, it can be hard.) Maybe the author was just having a terrible time as a writer and wanted to ostracize the community he desperately wanted to become a part of. (Side-eyes the article again.)

Regardless, the article was poorly written, the author comes across as a villain, AND the “tip” he gives (write everyday) while good for some people, simply can’t work for others. The author’s idea of “if you want to write a book, write everyday or quit” is a terrible mindset to have. To that end, here are five tips if you want to write a book:

1.) Read. Read so many books, inside your genre and out, whenever you can spare the time. Why? It’s important to see what’s been done in the literary world, it’s a way to build your repertoire of words (sounds weird, but seriously, reading helps you build your vocabulary), and it’s also a great space to gain inspiration.

2.) Read your work out loud. Yes, this also seems weird and maybe don’t do this in a coffee shop or other public place, but reading the scenes out loud will allow you to figure out the sticky spots, the weird transitions, the too-long sentences. It can help with pacing, too.

3.) Consider having a Post-it note on your computer (or somewhere you can dig it up easily) with an inspiring quote from your favorite author or from your favorite book. It’s something you can look at when times are rough, or when that one scene just isn’t working, or when you can’t think of how to make this one MC amazing. For me, I have this quote from Patrick Rothfuss when he guest starred on Critical Role as Ker saved on my desktop: “There are many things that move through fire and find themselves much better for it afterward.” 

4.) Try not to edit your first draft while you’re writing. It’s hard, I know. I also want to go back and fix things, but if you do that, you’ll literally never be done with the first draft. Give yourself permission to have that first draft be shit. Write whatever the hell you want. There’s always the second and third drafts to pull it into the shape you want it to be in.

5.) And finally, my last tip is a tip of the hat toward the Beast article. If you want to write a book, write. Simply write. You can write everyday. You can write once every week. You can write for a marathon weekend or a marathon month. But if you want to write a book, all you have to do is write. Write when it’s best for you.

BONUS TIP: And please, for the love of all the writing gods and goddesses and muses in this world and beyond, please don’t give up. Your story is worth telling.

I hope you have a lovely weekend.
Warm regards,
Kellie

Ten Things That Make Me Happy

Hello everyone!

So job hunting is tough. I’ve been looking for two months now and gotten very little leads. Plus it’s been super hot here in Portland, my body is freaking out, and I’m getting more and more annoyed about everything as the weeks go by. So, in order to cheer myself up, I’ve decided to list ten things that make me happy.

  1. chatting or hanging out with my friends and family
  2. whenever my cats do something silly/stupid/funny
  3. talking about my book and/or seeing a new review about Finding Hekate
  4. working on my new fantasy series – I’m up to magic now!
  5. watching (and being inspired by) Critical Role
  6. reading a new book (The Name of the Wind by Patrick Rothfuss is turning out okay, but more on that in another post!)
  7. listening to the rain while drinking tea/hot chocolate
  8. swimming
  9. crossing off things on my ToDo list
  10. getting hooked on a new cool TV show

I do this every now and then, write down things that makes me happy or say things that I’m grateful for. It helps to put me in a better mindset. I know I’ll eventually find a job, I know the summer will wind down into fall, and I know my body will stop freaking out. Until then, I just have to be patient and be happy about the good things I have right now.

So, what makes you happy? I’d love to know!
Warm regards,
Kellie

 

Critical Role Rolls Right Into My Geeky Heart

Hello fellow geeks!

Have you heard about Critical Role? It’s a Geek and Sundry show where a bunch of voice actors play D&D (Dungeons and Dragons, for those dice novices out there). If you’re at all interested in roleplaying games, or great acting, or amazing storytelling, or geeky subplots, or creatures of the dark, or anything at all, really, you should watch it.

Now I’m the first person to tell you that the first episode is kind-of slow. I had a rough time getting through it, but I was also late to the game, joining the party about three months after it had started and after it had built a pretty substantial fanbase. The audio on that first episode is crazy. The storytelling is a bit odd. And the characters seem way outta left field. But give it a chance. When you get to episode two and beyond, once they fix the audio and spruce the place up a bit, it’s an amazing show. See, at Critical Role’s core, it’s just a bunch of friends hanging out and playing a D&D campaign. They crack jokes. Laugh. Eat pizza or chicken or donuts. Compliment each other on their acting. And that’s how Critical Role started out, an at-home game between friends. Now, it’s a show with thousands of viewers (aptly called Critters) who dominate Twitter when it goes live on Thursday night on Twitch. It’s a show that spawns gorgeous fanart and risky fanfiction. One that brings people together, in person and online. One that transcends continents, even.

How can a D&D campaign get so popular? Well, a few different facets make this particular gem. The storytelling by Matthew Mercer, the dungeon master of the campaign, is amazing. He brings such life to the game, with his plot twists and turns, his many NPCs (non-playable characters) where each one has a different voice, and his ability to allow the other players do epic (and often humorous) stunts with a simple, “you can certainly try.” He’s the mastermind of the group, and a driving force of why so many Critters out there want to be DMs. Because of his storytelling, they’ve had a range of quests, from epic battles facing beholders to simple bar hopping adventures. His merry band of adventurers have faced death, been forced to make tough choices, and yes, even fallen in love under in his story spell. There’s action, adventure, romance, drama, and humor all rolled into one. His words paint a picture so clear, any writer would be jealous. (I certainly am, but I’m inspired, too!)

But he’s certainly not the only reason why Critters love the show. The other voice actors—the half-elf twins Vax and Vex played by Liam O’Brien and Laura Bailey, the human gunslinger Percy played by Taliesin Jaffe, the druid Keyleth played by Marisha Ray, the barbarian Grog played by Travis Willingham, and the gnome Scanlan played by Sam Riegel—form the band of adventurers called Vox Machina. They’re at the core of what makes this show so great. Their easy banter during the quiet moments make even shopping for potions memorable, and they play their characters so well sometimes I forget that Marisha’s name isn’t Keyleth. Sometimes, like in a particularly harrowing moment in Episode 44, I forget that Vax and Vex aren’t actually “real” but because of Liam and Laura’s portrayals, the characters feel real to me. And to everyone else who watches the show. Their conversations span everything, like professing love in an awkward manner nearly everyone can relate to and apologizing for setting a death trap off to how a certain someone can keep smiling when everything seems to go to hell. They’re as relatable as a druid, half-elf, barbarian, gnome, and human can be. They’re obvious concern for one another makes the show worth watching, their interactions and character dynamic keeps the show moving forward, and honestly, the way each character balances the rest out is fascinating to watch.

They sometimes have guest actors join in the fray, too! Here I’ll add in Ashley Johnson, who plays Pike, as a constant reoccurring character. (So much so, she should probably be considered part of Vox Machina but because of Ashley’s current work schedule, she can’t be around as much as she’d probably like.) There’s also been Will Friedle and Mary Elizabeth Mcglynn. It’s always fun to see someone else join the campaign, react to the characters, and be completely awed my Matt’s words. (Other than the thousands of Critters watching.)

Okay. I’ve gushed about this show enough. But really, there’s never enough. Critical Role celebrated its one-year anniversary on Twitch in April, just had it’s its 60th episode as a highly successful liveshow and will be doing another one at GenCon, and (hopefully) still has many years to come. It’s made D&D cool to the mainstream audience. Made geeks and nerds who like spending time imagining themselves as wizards and fighting dragons feel accepted. Spawned many, many other D&D campaigns. Clearly it’s rolled right into my heart and thousands of others. Will it roll right into yours?

If there are any fellow critters out there, leave me a comment about who your favorite character is and why! To all the newbies I’ve successfully turned on to the show, let’s chat when you’re a few episodes in!

I hope you have a lovely Friday!
Warm regards,
Kellie

Eight Reasons Why I Write

Hello all!

This week I’ve been doing things like getting ready for Write to Publish 2016—brainstorming cool ideas to pursue in January—and thinking about my novel Finding Hekate more—brainstorming marketing ideas and review places—and napping. There’s been a lot of napping. And watching Critical Role. It’s the week after finals, don’t judge!

I meant to write more this week, but I didn’t. I don’t know why. Maybe it’s because I wrote a 20-page (double-spaced) paper on fanfiction for finals week. Maybe it’s because I wrote a 9-page (single-spaced) transmedia marketing plan for a digital teen scavenger hunt for finals week. Maybe it’s because I didn’t plan time per day to write. I just know I didn’t write.

But, because of Suddenly Jamie’s post last week, I did wonder why I write. Here are some reasons:

  1. Because I love characterization.
    • I’ve always loved creating the characters. Ever since I was little I always wanted to figure characters out, their names, eye color, hair color, backgrounds, family, friends, who they are, what they want. It was fun to create them, to put a part of myself into them or to be something I could never be. Now, I know from all those motivational posters that I can be anyone I want to be. But a dragon hunter? Technically, I can’t be that. A woman who had to kill to survive? I really don’t wanna be that. But I do want to write about it.
  2. Because I love worldbuilding.
    • Worldbuilding, like characterization, is another one of my favorites. Creating a whole new world, crafting the rules, the customs, the cultures of these new peoples. Of these new races. The history and lore of the world is in my mind (or in my notes) even if the readers never know about it.
  3. Because it makes me feel powerful, in a weird, strange, awkward kind of way.
    • It may (or may not?) be apparent, but I like creating things. Crafting worlds and characters out of nothing. It makes me feel powerful, in a way. I’ve created numerous worlds and characters, for short stories, flash fictions, poems, novels. The readers may never know it all, and probably shouldn’t know it all, but I know it. And that’s a cool feeling.
  4. Because I want to get better at it.
    • Writing is…overly romanticized in some ways. When you say “writer” we all get this image of a figure hunched over a computer in the midst of a creative breakthrough surrounded by coffee and stacks of paper and cats. (Okay, I added the cats part.) In other ways, the romance is spot on, like when you get a burst of creativity. When you write all night long (or all day). When you get that flash of a character or of a world or of some badass weapon this or that character really should use. But it’s not easy by any means. It takes work. And a good portion of why I write is so I can become a better writer.
  5. Because I want to get better at it.
    • I need to get better at it. I need to hone my craft! Practice makes perfect, you know? The way I figure it, the best is yet to come.
  6. Because I want to get better at it.
    • Yes, I know. Three times. But it bears repeating. I want to—no, I will get better at this craft of mine.
  7. Because becoming an author is a dream of mine.
    • It’s a dream of mine to be published. And right now, that dream is coming true! But I don’t want to be a one-hit-wonder. I want to publish a bunch of books. This duology is just the start!
  8. Because it’s fun!
    • Some people build things. Some people compose music. Some people teach kids. There is a whole world of things people can have fun doing. For me, it’s writing!

There are many other reasons why I write, but these are some pretty good ones! So, why do you write? Or, why do you do the thing you’re most passionate about? Let me know in the comments!

Have a safe and happy holiday season!
Warm regards,
Kellie